Past SKY Courses (2014-2020)

Topelia fountain park
Bulletin 26.3.2020

An archive of SKY courses & events 2014-2020

2021

Tilastot ja akateeminen asiantuntijuus: Tilastojen ymmärtäminen ja surveyn laatiminen 

Aika: keskiviikko 28.4.2021 klo 9-15
Paikka: Zoom (linkki lähetetään ilmoittautuneille ennen kurssia)
Kohderyhmä: SKY-tohtoriopiskelijat ja ohjaajat
Kieli: suomi, mutta kysymyksiä voi esittää myös englanniksi 

Mitä numeroiden takana on? Millaisia valintoja liittyy kyselytutkimuksen laatimiseen ja mitä ne vaikuttavat siihen, millaista tietoa tuotetaan? Tilastokeskuksen yliaktuaari Henna Attila opettaa käytännön taitoja, joita tarvitaan tilastojen ymmärtämisessä ja tilastollisen tutkimuksen toteuttamisessa. 

Kurssilaisilta ei edellytetä aikaisempaa tietämystä tilastoista tai tilastotieteestä. 

Kurssi tarjoaa akateemisessa elämässä tarvittavat perustaidot tilastollisen tiedon ymmärtämiseen, käyttämiseen ja tuottamiseen. Kurssilla opitaan tilastojen ymmärtämisen lisäksi kriittistä tilastolukutaitoa ja keinoja tilastotiedon luotettavuuden arvioimiseen. Lisäksi osallistujat saavat perustiedot ja käytännön ohjeita oman tilastollisen tutkimuksen suunnittelemiseen ja toteuttamiseen. 

Tilastollisen tiedon tuottamisessa ja ymmärtämisessä huomioitavia asioita havainnollistetaan lukuisilla käytännön esimerkeillä Tilastokeskuksessa viime vuosina toteutetuista yhteiskunnallisista tilastotutkimuksista. Niiden aihepiirejä ovat mm. työllisyys, sukupuolten tasa-arvo, ajankäyttö, kulutus, luottamus yhteiskuntaan sekä henkilökohtaiset arvot. 

Ennen kurssia osallistujien toivotaan perehtyvän tiiviiseen esitykseen tilastotiedon tulkinnassa huomioitavista asioista (pdf).

Ennakkomateriaali on englanniksi, mutta kurssi pidetään suomeksi. Kurssi toteutetaan Zoomissa keskiviikkona 28.4.2021 klo 9-15. Kurssi vastaa 2 opintopistettä ja on suunnattu ensisijaisesti SKY-tohtoriopiskelijoille sekä myös ohjaajille. Kurssin yhteyshenkilöt: Elina Penttinen (elina.penttinen@helsinki.fi) ja Marjut Jyrkinen (marjut.jyrkinen@helsinki.fi).   

 

2020

Feminist scholarship that matters? Matters where?

SKY doctoral course at the University of Helsinki, 19, 24 & 26 March 2020 (5 ECT)

This PhD course will discuss expectations and ideals for how feminist social science can and should matter in personally, politically and in societies. These questions matter on the global scale, especially for global social justice, but also for the sense of personal motivation. How do different feminist traditions translate into political practices in different contexts? Social scientists participate in different epistemic and ontological discussions that are often regarded as internal academic debates; yet in the feminist social science the orientation to the “political” takes many different forms. What are the current discussions regarding political engagements in feminist academia in the Caribbean and Southern Africa? In Finland?
The course is carried out as a workshop during which the course teachers and participants discuss the PhD students’ projects of various stages. The aim is to help the PhD students to develop their personal thoughts and make them more explicitly pronounced regarding the (personal) politics of knowledge production, promises of science, making a difference, academic activism, the ideal, promise, relevance, impact, or meaning of one’s own work. This seminar is designed as a chance to stay a moment together to reflect on why one does academic work in the first place, and discuss different aspects in feminist desires involved.

Course teachers: Rhoda Reddock, Grace Khonou, Liu Xin, Elina Oinas
Contact person: Elina Oinas Elina.oinas@helsinki.fi

About the external teachers:
Rhoda REDDOCK, is Professor of Gender, Social Change and Development, the University of the West Indies, St. Augustine Campus, Trinidad and Tobago. Prof Reddock is a member of the Excecutive Committee of the International Sociological Association. She has served as founder, chair, adviser, or member of several organizations, such as the Caribbean Association for Feminist Research and Action (CAFRA),[1] the Global Fund for Women, and the Regional Advisory Committee of the Global Coalition on Women and AIDS established by UNAIDS. In 2002 she received the Seventh CARICOM Triennial Award for Women, was Trinidad and Tobago's nominee for the International Women of Courage Award in 2008, and was honoured in her country's National Honour Awards ceremony in 2012 with the Gold Medal for the Development of Women. Her recent publications include “Up Against a Wall”: Muslim Women’s Struggle to Reclaim Masjid Space in Trinidad and Tobago”, in Aisha Khan (ed.) Islam and the Americas, Gainesville, University Press of Florida, 2015, pp. 217-248. “Radical Caribbean Social Thought: Race, Class, Identity and the Postcolonial Nation” Current Sociology, Vol. 62 No. 4, July 2014, pp. 493-511 Sex, Power and Taboo: Gender and HIV in the Caribbean and Beyond, Randle Publishers, Kingston and Miami, 2009 (co-edited with Dorothy Roberts, Dianne Douglas and Sandra Reid) Interrogating Caribbean Masculinities: Theoretical and Empirical Analyses, The UWI Press, Kingston 2004 (Edited Collection).
http://www2.sta.uwi.edu/pelican/60under60/rreddock.asp

Grace KHUNOU is Professor in the Sociology Department at the University of Johannesburg, South Africa. After obtaining her PhD from the University of Witwatersrand, Wits, in 2007 she worked as a Senior Social Policy Analyst in the Department of Social Development, South Africa National Government 2007-09. Prof Khonou is a member of the Excecutive Committee of the International Sociological Association, and has acted as a Member of the Editorial Board for the ISA SAGE Studies in International Sociology, and the Chairperson of the Wits Faculty of Humanities Transformation Committee 2011-2013. She writes creatively and academically and has published in peer-reviewed journals, book chapters and research reports. Her research interests are Gender and health; Masculinities; Black Middle Class; Father Connections and Father Identity, as well as the role of universities in society.
https://www.uj.ac.za/contact/pages/grace-khunou.aspx

LIU XIN is a postdoctoral researcher at the Swedish School of Social Sciences, University of Helsinki. Liu Xin has published in Australian Feminist Studies, Parallax, MAI: Feminism & Visual Culture, Girlhood Studies, NORA, Nordic Journal of Migration Research, Sukupuolentutkimus-Genusforskning, Feminist Encounters: A journal of Critical Studies in Culture and Politics. Her recent projects examine the phenomenon of air pollution in the Chinese context as well as the reproduction of norms in digital games.

Elina OINAS works as Professor in Sociology at the Swedish School of Social Science at the University of Helsinki. Her research deals with shifting knowledge practices, power, gender, development/transformation and health in different organisations and contexts, often contrasting sites in the Nordic countries and in Africa. She is currently working on “relevance” and contextuality in biomedicine and gender research in comparative perspective in Finland, Benin, Ethiopia and South Africa, focusing on a vaccine trial and feminist academia. These projects are funded by the Academy of Finland, Svenska litteratursällskapet and Finnish Cultural Foundation.

Course structure and requirements:

Prior to course:
· Think, write and submit a compilation of three assignments in one text:
a one page description of your dissertation project (a project abstract of 300-400 words) with information on the discipline and the stage of the project, and
8-10-page paper which is a part of your dissertation project, any text is fine
1-3 pages discussion paper in a style freely chosen by you, where you discuss your own thoughts on first, ideals for academic knowledge in general, and second, how you see your own work as a contribution to something; society, self, movement, community etc.

Combine these texts in one file and submit it by Monday 9 March 2020.
· Read other PhD students’ pre-delivered materials.
· Familiarize yourself with the reading list of recommended literature that will be sent to the participants upon the acceptance.

During the course:
· Attend the panel discussion by the professors at Christina Research Seminar on the 24 March, and the seminar days on 19&26 March. Attendance involves commenting other students’ papers and discussing one’s own project.

Application
Apply in the e-form by February 10th 2020,
or, with an e-mail by February 10, 2020 to elina.oinas@helsinki.fi with following information:
name, university, doctoral program, field of research, title, stage of PhD

Applicants will be informed on acceptance by February 15th, 2020.

Trans/feminism

SKY doctoral course at the University of Helsinki, March 6, 2020
Venue: Metsätalo (Unioninkatu 40), hall 30 (5th floor)

Course teachers Prof. Susan Stryker (Yale University), Dr. Julian Honkasalo (University of Helsinki) and Dr. Sanna Karhu (University of Helsinki) 

The course is organized by the University of Helsinki Doctoral Programme in Gender, Culture, and Society (SKY). The course is open for all SKY students, other University of Helsinki PhD students, and for students from other Finnish universities and universities abroad. There is no registration fees but travelling costs can unfortunately not be covered by the University of Helsinki. The course welcomes max 8 student participants. 

Course description

The PhD course is an article seminar, which focuses on the relationship between feminist theory, transgender studies, activism and history. 

The article seminar welcomes PhD students from multiple fields. Students working on trans studies, disability studies, activism, queer theory, feminist and queer history, intersectional feminist theory, literary studies, legal studies etc. are all welcome. No previous knowledge of transgender studies as an academic field is necessary to apply to the course but priority will be given to those students whose work focuses in one way or the other on gender and sexual minorities or intersectional feminist theory more broadly (i.e. disability studies, critique of racism, post-colonial studies).

The course consists of a full day seminar (10-6pm with a proper lunch break and a long coffee break) during which the course instructors and participants discuss the assigned readings. Learning activities of the course will consist in mini presentations and academic discussion and analysis of the texts. The learning outcome of the seminar is that students will be able to perform close readings of advanced academic texts on trans studies. In addition, students will be able to understand the intersectional relationship between feminist history, feminist activism and questions concerning transgender social justice. The course discussion will follow common university safe space guidelines.

Course instructors

Prof. Susan Stryker is an award-winning scholar and filmmaker whose historical research, theoretical writing, and creative works have helped shape the cultural conversation on transgender topics since the early 1990s. Dr. Stryker earned her Ph.D. in United States History at the University of California-Berkeley in 1992, later held a Ford Foundation/Social Science Research Council post-doctoral fellowship in sexuality studies at Stanford University, and—before her one-year appointment at Yale (2019-2020)—has been a distinguished visiting faculty member at Harvard University, Northwestern University, Johns Hopkins University, University of California-Santa Cruz, Macquarie University in Sydney, and Simon Fraser University in Vancouver. She is the author, co-author, editor, or co-editor of numerous books and anthologies, including Gay by the Bay: A History of Queer Culture in the San Francisco Bay Area (Chronicle 1996), Queer Pulp: Perverse Passions in the Golden Age of the Paperback (Chronicle 2000), The Transgender Studies Reader (Routledge 2006), Transgender History: The Roots of Today’s Revolution (Seal Press 2008, 2017), and The Transgender Studies Reader 2 (2013).

Her academic articles have appeared in such publications as GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies, Radical History Review, South Atlantic Quarterly, Parallax, Australian Feminist Studies, Social Semiotics, and Journal of Women’s History, while her public scholarship has appeared in Aperture, Wired, The Utne Reader, and Slate.com. She won an Emmy Award for her documentary film Screaming Queens: The Riot at Compton’s Cafeteria (ITVS 2005), and is also the recipient of a Lambda Literary Award (2006), the Ruth Benedict Book Prize (2013), the Monette-Horowitz Prize for LGBTQ activism (2008), the Transgender Law Center’s Community Vanguard Award (2003), two career achievement awards in LGBTQ Studies—the David Kessler Award in  from the City University of New York’s Center for LGBT Studies in 2008, and Yale University’s Brudner Memorial Prize in 2015—and the Local Genius Award from Tucson’s Museum of Contemporary Art in 2018. Dr. Stryker served for several years as Executive Director of the GLBT Historical Society in San Francisco (1999-2003). At the University of Arizona, where she is currently on leave from her appointment as Professor of Gender and Women’s Studies, she served for five years as Director of the Institute for LGBT Studies (2011-2016) and was founder of the university’s unprecedented Transgender Studies Initiative and faculty cluster hire. She will hold the Barbara Lee Professorship in Women’s Leadership at Mills College (Oakland, CA) 2020-2022. While continuing to serve as founding co-editor of the academic journal TSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly (Duke), Dr. Stryker is currently developing several media projects, and has a book under contract to Farrar Straus Giroux, What Transpires Now, about the uses of transgender history for the present.

Dr. Julian Honkasalo is an Academy of Finland postdoctoral researcher in Gender Studies at the University of Helsinki. He holds a PhD in Gender Studies, University of Helsinki, 2016, and a PhD in Political Science, The New School for Social Research, 2018. Honkasalo’s current postdoctoral research project is titled: Trans Futures: Community-Building as Resistance to Biopolitics. The project focuses on the historical connection between race hygiene and gender norms, as well as the history of trans resistance to biopolitics.

Dr. Sanna Karhu, is a Postdoctoral Researcher in Gender Studies, in the Department of Cultures, University of Helsinki. The title of Karhu’s project is Animal Trouble: A New Ecofeminist Critique of Speciesism.Karhu received a PhD in 2017 with a dissertation titled From Violence to Resistance: Judith Butler's Critique of Norms. The dissertation is available as open access via E-thesis (copyrighted). During the years 2016–2017 Karhu worked as a visiting graduate research scholar at New York University and was a fellow in Prof. Judith Butler's Master Class at The Institute for Critical Social Inquiry (ICSI), The New School for Social Research in 2016.

Course requirements 

Prior to the course: 

·  Read the preassigned course reading (4 articles) that will be sent to the participants upon the acceptance. 

·  Prepare a short (max 10 min) oral presentation on one of the articles assigned for the course. The course instructors will assign the text upon acceptance.

During the course:

·  Attending the full one-day article seminar on March 6. Attendance involves discussing actively the course readings. 

·  Attending Prof. Susan Stryker’s public Christina research lecture ‘Trans/feminism’ on Thursday March 5, 4-6pm.  

Application procedure

Please apply with a short, freely written description max 250-300 words of your dissertation project and explain why you want to enroll the course. Please send your application to julian.honkasalo(at)helsinki.fi or sanna.karhu(at)helsinki.fi. Please apply by February 10 2020.  Applicants will be informed on acceptance by Feb 11, 2020. 

SKY doctoral programme welcomes you to join SKY BEGIN event at Thursday February 6th 2020, at 12–16 (lunch included).

Venue: Language Center, Fabianinkatu 26, seminar room 204,  (lunch 12-13, at Bryggeri, Sofiankatu 2)

SKY BEGIN 

This afternoon event with (relatively) new PhD-students and their supervisors will answer two sets of questions.

1) We will discuss various aspects of the structures of PhD studies at UH.

   - For many PhD students and supervisors, the present organization of doctoral studies is  - for good reasons - confusing with its different levels of structures (doctoral programme, doctoral school, the faculty, the discipline, the organizing faculty, the responsible professor, the supervisor, the second supervisor, etc. ).  In order to sort out some of this jungle, we will hear short presentations which will clarify the organizational structures, as well as the tasks and responsibilities of each level, and what can you expect from each level as a PhD student or as a supervisor.

2) We will discuss together various experiences, questions, worries, and expectations about what will take place and what should take place within the course of the of PhD studies

 -For a beginning PhD-student it is – understandably – often unclear what PhD studentship involves, what is expected, and what one can reasonably wish from doctoral studies. To reflect on the various trajectories of PhD studies, we will also hear short presentations of recent SKY PhD’s who will reflect on their period of doctoral studies. Issues covered will include, for example: what one can expect and what is on one’s own responsibility; PhD seminars, SKY events; conferences; publishing during the PhD studies;  teaching; internationalization, periods abroad;  integration within discipline(s), research community, networks; the changing study requirements, the structure of studies; supervision agreement;   - PhD student’s independent responsibility and supervisor’s responsibilities are discussed. 

This is also a possibility for you to meet other SKY students and supervisors. Any SKY student or supervisor is welcome to join in.

Sign up for the event by January 31st, 2020 at the latest (form)! 

2019

How to Read your Research Materials (5 ECTs) , SKY doctoral course, University of Helsinki, 14-15 March 2019

Course introduction:

This PhD course is a two-day workshop for current PhD students that focuses on gender, sexuality and feminism. It will be the first of a series of methodology oriented PhD workshops within the doctoral programme Gender, Culture and Society (SKY). In this workshop invited experts on different methods of reading and analyzing various types of research materials, together with the participating PhD candidates, will comment on, and offer readings of, samples of materials from their own and others’ PhD projects.

In this first workshop, Tuija Pulkkinen and Ann Phoenix, will provide in their lectures examples of their methods of reading the materials in their own research and will contextualize their methodological choices within the wide scope of possible, creative research practices that are currently burgeoning.

The idea of the course is to provide insights from experienced researchers into their research practices and to give hands on experience of dealing with the many different issues and problems that arise for anybody dealing with research materials. The aim is to help those attending to see how they can advance and complete their analyses and writing to high international standards.

The two workshop facilitators have long histories of research and writing in a wide area of feminist scholarship and gender studies, ranging from philosophical and historical analysis of concepts in texts, to applying psychological, sociological, political, and creative analytic insights to research materials. They will give talks that illustrate their chosen methods and lead discussion of student materials. Fieldwork notes, internet based materials, visual methods, literary or historical and other types of texts can be included. PhD projects within a wide multidisciplinary range of humanities, social sciences, pedagogical, theological, and law studies; work on feminist and queer theory, contemporary society and politics, social research and conceptual analysis are all welcome. The theoretical frames of the PhD projects will also be varied, building on research within the interdisciplinary areas of feminist and gender studies and including its intersections with postcolonial theory, queer theory and politics, disability studies, and critical animal studies.

The course is arranged by University of Helsinki Doctoral Programme Gender Culture and Society (SKY). It is open for applications from PhD students from all universities.

The Teachers:

Ann Phoenix is professor of Psychosocial Studies at the Thomas Coram Research Unit, Department of Social Science, UCL Institute of Education. Her research research interests are psychosocial, focusing on personal, psychological issues in sociostructural context. She takes an intersectional perspective to gender, where racialisation, social class, sexuality, space and, place and nation are addressed across different studies. The areas on which she works include motherhood, social identities and young people. Her recent funded research project areas include: boys and masculinities in Helsinki schools, adult re-conceptualisations of

'non-normative' childhoods', particularly of serial migration, visibly ethnically mixed households and language brokering in transnational families and narratives of environment in children and families in India and the UK. Some of her major grants include funding of the UK Childhood Wellbeing Research Centre and a methodological centre that focused on narratives and secondary qualitative analysis (NOVELLA).

Tuija Pulkkinen is professor of Gender Studies at the University of Helsinki. Her work is on texts, thinkers, ideas and concepts, and her methods include focus on history of concepts, and use of concepts in texts. has done research in the area of contemporary feminist theorists, philosophy, history, and politics, and on feminist and queer scholarship. She has published on political thought and democratic theory; on conceptual change, and on history of feminism and gender and queer studies. She studies ideas and words in texts, and in has developed approach of which she calls “politics of philosophy”.

Attending the course will require you to:

1. Before the course: Delivering 1) a 2-3 page description (which may be the table of contents) of the dissertation project, including a description of the research material in the PhD project. 2) An example of the material (not more than 4 pages; for example an extract from an interview, focus group discussion, internet material, a media text, visual images or objects, a literary or theory text) 3) a 2-3 page problem-paper: a reflection on the problems or issues that reading this material raises methodologically within the PhD project. 4) Reading of the other PhD students’ pre-delivered materials and preparing to comment on their projects and problem/issue-papers. 5) Reading some of the pre-assigned literature.

2. 2. Attending the 2-day workshop on 13-14 March 2019. Commenting on the projects and papers of other students, and discussing your own project with the teachers and co-students. The course includes the talks by the Tuija Pulkkinen and Ann Phoenix.

Applications with a max 100-words on the PhD project and it’s methodological challenges by 25th February 2019. Deadline for sending the deliverables: 7 March 2019.

Fill in the application and submit your abstract at: https://elomake.helsinki.fi/lomakkeet/96051/lomake.html

Please feel free to distribute the call. SKY students will have privileged access to the course but it is open to other Helsinki University PhD students and to students of other Finnish universities and universities abroad who will be admitted.

The maximum number of students will be capped at 8 to allow sufficient time for engagement with each students’ materials

Problematizing Hegemonic Masculinity (5 ECTs) SKY -doctoral course at University of Helsinki, 25-26 February 2019

Course organizer (PI): Dr. Josephine Hoegaerts (University of Helsinki, Finland)

Visiting course lecturer: Dr. Ben Griffin (University of Cambridge, UK)

Course introduction:

This PhD course aims to critically engage with the concept of ‘hegemonic masculinity’ and other conceptualizations of gender allowing the analysis of power relations between masculinities in different contexts. The course takes its methodological inspiration mainly from historical research on masculinities, but is open to wider discussions on masculinity and societal and cultural difference and change. The lecturers have the aim of helping the PhD students to advance and complete their dissertation projects with the highest international quality.

The course literature comprises scholarship ranging from feminist and anthropological theory to queer studies on kinship and relatedness to the politics and legal constellations of family, kinship and care relations.

The course focuses on developing PhD student projects, where all of the projects cluster around a set of themes related to contemporary and historical discussions of masculinity, gender and (institutionalized) power, gender and politics and the relations between masculinities.

The expertise of the teachers is in a wide area of masculinity and gender studies, representative politics, disability studies and British and European history. The teachers are prepared to comment on empirical, methodological and/or theoretical aspects of PhD research papers and students’ original research or fieldwork. However, theoretical projects that comment on the existing work of various scholars that intersect with gender history or masculinity studies are also welcome.

The course includes the public lecture by Dr. Ben Griffin “Hegemonic Masculinity as a Historical Problem”.

The course is organized by the University of Helsinki Doctoral Programme for Gender, Culture, and Society (SKY) together with the ERC project CALLIOPE: Vocal Articulations of Parliamentary Identity and Empire.

The course is open for all SKY students, other Helsinki University PhD students and for students of other Finnish universities and all universities abroad.

Course Teachers:

Ben Griffin is a Lecturer in Modern British History at the University of Cambridge. His research is focused on the ways in which gender has shaped political processes in Britain since the late eighteenth century. I particularly studies the history of masculinity, and the ways in which changing ideas about masculinity have shaped the behaviour and expectations of political elites. His first book, The Politics of Gender in Victorian Britain, argued that changes to women’s rights were not simply the result of changing ideas about women but also changing beliefs about masculinity, religion and the nature of the constitution and, in doing so, it demonstrates how gender inequality can be created and reproduced by the state.  His current research project is a book called The Gender Order and the Judicial Imagination, which examines how changing ideas about masculinity interacted with new forms of legal knowledge to reshape the gender order in Britain between 1780 and 1940.

Josephine Hoegaerts is an Associate Professor of European Studies at the University of Helsinki and the author of Masculinity and Nationhood, 1830-1910: Constructions of Identity and Citizenship in Belgium, Genders and Sexualities in History, Palgrave-MacMillan, 2014; “Speaking like Intelligent Men: Vocal Articulations of Authority and Identity in the House of Commons in the Nineteenth Century”, in: Radical History Review (themed issue: Sound Politics), 121, 123-144 and “La voix du pays. Masculinity, vocal authority and the disembodied citizen in the nineteenth century”, in: Sauer B. and Starck, K. (eds.) A Man’s World? Political Masculinities in Literature and Culture, Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2014,  39-50. She is currently PI of CALLIOPE: Vocal Articulations of Parliamentary Identity and Empire.

Course structure and requirements:

1. Prior to course-start:

A) Submitting a 2-page description of the dissertation project (a project abstract of 300-400 words and the table of contents), and a research paper of 10–12 pages (part of the dissertation project).

B) Reading of pre-assigned literature and the other PhD students’ pre-delivered materials: course reading list reading list will be send to the participants together with the letter acceptance, on Monday the 28th. Full student papers will be sent after the submission date: the 15th of February.

2. During the course:

A) Attending the full 2-day workshop on 25-26 February 2019. Attendance involves the following activities: Commenting on the projects and papers of the other students, and discussing one’s own project with the teachers and co-students.

B) Attending Dr. Ben Griffin’s public lecture “Hegemonic Masculinity as a Historical Problem” on Tuesday 26 February 2019, 4–6pm. Course students are expected to take actively part in the discussion after the lecture. 


Information on application procedure and deadlines (josephine.hoegaerts@helsinki.fi):Apply with a max 150-word abstract of the paper by Friday 25th January 2019 by filling the e-form:

Deadline for submitting full course papers is Friday 15th February 2019

NB! A number of foreign students would be accepted on the roll basis if they need more time to arrange their travel/grant.

Maximum number of students accepted for the course is 10.

Decolonising Knowledge Systems in the Social Sciences: The Power of Silences

(5 ECTS) -SKY doctoral workshop, University of Helsinki, 5-6th. November

Course organizer:  Elina Penttinen University lecturer, Gender Studies, PI Incorporating Vulnerability: a non-fragmented approach to feminist research on violence, University of Helsinki

With guest lecturer: Associate Professor Swati Parashar School of Global Studies, University of Gothenburg

Course description and goals:

There is a strong case for decolonisation of the Social Sciences and Gender studies, to break away from established thought processes, namely Eurocentric categories and concepts and open up to non-Western and non-linear forms of knowledges. For example, we need to think of societies in the global South as “knowing subjects” instead of “passive objects” available for Western research and scholarship. We need to ask how decolonization of knowledge systems challenges key themes in feminist methodology, such as self-reflectivity and sensitivity to power relations in the process of research and inquire whether feminist methodology is always already decolonized. One way to do this is to decolonise the methods we adopt in our research and the epistemological frameworks through which we participate in knowledge creation and ask what are the practical consequences in terms for our research practices.

In this workshop we explore ways in which we can decolonise knowledge systems and reflect on our own subjectivities and research projects in that process. We collectively rethink the methods we use in our research and the epistemologies that frame our research questions and discuss innovative solutions. As an innovative method, we pay attention to various kinds of silences as a site of power in contested terrains. We discuss the ways to study silences and what they might reveal about power relations and survival strategies in sights of conflict and other constricted conditions. 

This workshop is useful for PhD students at all stages of the research process, who wish to work on clarifying epistemological frameworks, methodology and methods and create new insight.

The course is open for all SKY students, other Helsinki University PhD students and for students of other Finnish universities and all universities abroad.

The course includes a public lecture by Prof. Swati Parashar: Postcolonial Anxiety and the Crisis of Masculinity: The Rise of Right Wing Hindutva Movement in India.

The course is organized by the University of Helsinki Doctoral Programme for Gender, Culture, and Society (SKY) together with Incorporating Vulnerability: a non-fragmented approach to feminist research on violence (Helsinki University Three year grants)

Bio

Swati Parashar is Associate Professor in Peace and Development at the School of Global Studies, University of Gothenburg, Sweden and Visiting Faculty, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, India. In 2016, she was a Visiting Fellow at the Centre for the Study of Developing Societies (CSDS), Delhi. Her research engages with the intersections between feminism and postcolonialism, focused on conflict and development issues in South Asia. She is the author of Women and Militant Wars: The Politics of Injury (Routledge: London, 2014) and co-editor (with Ann Tickner and Jacqui True) of Revisiting Gendered States: Feminist Imaginings of the State in International Relations (OUP: London, New York 2018)

Elina Penttinen is a University lecturer and Director of Master’s programme in Gender Studies, University of Helsinki. She is the PI of a multidisicpilinary research project Incorporating Vulnerability a non-fragmented approach to feminist research on violence, funded by University of Helsinki Three year grants. She is the author of of Gender and Mobility: a critical introduction (2017) Rowman & Littlefield; Joy and International Relations: a new methodology (2013) Routledge, Globalization, Prostitution and Sex-Trafficking: corporeal politics (2008) Routledge. She teaches courses on feminist methodology, scientific writing, gender and culture and supervises doctoral thesis projects in Gender, Culture and Society doctoral programme.

2018

Queer/ing Kinship

(5 ECTs) SKY -doctoral course at University of Helsinki, 3-4 December 2018

Course organizer (PI): Dr. Antu Sorainen (University of Helsinki, Finland)

Visiting course lecturers:

Dr. Elisabeth Lund Engebretsen (University of Stavanger, Norway)

Dr. Thomas Strong (Maynooth University, Ireland)

Course introduction:

This PhD course concentrates on the ongoing work of the participating PhD students on kinship, care and support networks located at sexual and gendered margins. The experienced lecturers have the aim of helping the PhD students to advance and complete their dissertation projects with the highest international quality.

The course literature comprises scholarship ranging from feminist and anthropological theory to queer studies on kinship and relatedness to the politics and legal constellations of family, kinship and care relations.

The course focuses on developing PhD student projects, where all of the projects cluster around a set of themes related to contemporary discussion of kinship/relationality and various axes of inequality or marginalisation (in particular, sexuality and gender).

The expertise of the three lecturers is in a wide area of kinship, relatedness, gender studies, queer theory and ethnography. All three have conducted original empirical research on alternative kinship and care relations, published widely in this area, and contributed towards re-invigorating contemporary ethnographic and methodological approaches.

The lecturers are prepared to comment on empirical, methodological and/or theoretical aspects of PhD research papers and students’ original research or fieldwork. However, theoretical projects that comment on the existing work of various scholars that intersect with gender studies, queer theory and kinship politics are also very welcome.

The course includes the public lecture by Dr. Thomas Strong:  “Errors in Kinship: Witches, Queers”.

The course is organized by the University of Helsinki Doctoral Programme for Gender, Culture, and Society (SKY) together with the two Academy of Finland projects CoreKin – Contrasting and Re-Imagining the Margins of Kinship and Wills and Inheritance in Sexually Marginalised Groups.

The course is open for all SKY students, other Helsinki University PhD students and for students of other Finnish universities and all universities abroad.

Course Teachers:

Elisabeth Lund Engebretsen is an Associate Professor of Gender Studies, University of Stavanger, Norway. Engebretsen holds a PhD in Anthropology from the London School of Economics (2008). Among her publications are Queer Women in Urban China: An Ethnography (2014), and the co-edited special issue of Sexualities on “Anthropology’s queer sensibilities” (2017). She has conducted extensive ethnographic fieldwork in China on queer kinship, family strategies, identity and activism, and has current research interests in Norwegian queer history, transnational Pride activism, feminist ethnography and methodology, and radical solidarity work. Engebretsen heads the 2-year workshop project Transforming Identities: Exploring changes, tensions, and visions in the Nordic region through the prism of identity politics (2018-2020).

Thomas Strong teaches in the Department of Anthropology at Maynooth University (Ireland). He was educated at Reed College (BA) and Princeton University (PhD), and taught at the University of Helsinki in 2006-08. He has published essays on the symbolism and sociality of blood supplies, queer theory and the anthropology of kinship, and problematics of modernity in Papua New Guinea, among other topics. Currently, he is preparing a book manuscript provisionally entitled "Blood to Blood: Witchcraft and the Violence of Kinship in Papua New Guinea,” based on long-term fieldwork in the Asaro Valley that he began in 1998. He has been an AIDS activist since 1992.

Antu Sorainen is an Academy Fellow at the Academy of Finland and Docent in Gender Studies at the University of Helsinki. She has conducted empirical studies in the area of queer will-writing and relatedness, and published work on law and queer sexualities. She is the co-author of Siveellisyydest䠓eksuaalisuuteen with Tuija Pulkkinen and has published recently on inheritance arrangements in queer communities. She is Academy of Finland Research Fellow for a project entitled: “Wills and Inheritance in Sexually Marginalised Groups” (2014-2019), and the director of the research project “CoreKin – Contrasting and Re-Imagining the Margins of Kinship” (2016-2020).

Course structure and requirements:

1. Prior to course-start:

A) Submitting a 2-page description of the dissertation project (a project abstract of 300-400 words and the table of contents), and a research paper of 10–12 pages (part of the dissertation project).

B) Reading of pre-assigned literature and the other PhD students’ pre-delivered materials: course reading list and full student papers will be sent to the participants after 23th November, after the applications have been decided on.

2. During the course:

A) Attending the full 2-day workshop on 3-4 December 2018. Attendance involves the following activities: Commenting on the projects and papers of the other students, and discussing one’s own project with the teachers and co-students.

B) Attending Dr. Thomas Strong’s public lecture “Errors in Kinship: Witches, Queers” on Tuesday 4th December 2018, 4–6pm. Course students are expected to take actively part in the discussion after the lecture. 


https://www.facebook.com/events/190163735155916/

http://corekin.fi/2018/06/20/apply-now-international-phd-course-queer-in...

Feminist Research in the Social Sciences and Humanities (5ECTS) 

Helsinki University Summer School Course: 7.8.-23.8.2018 
Organiser: Centre for Nordic Studies, University of Helsinki
Coordinators:  Merle Wessel & Cai Weaver

Synopsis  
This practical course educates students in how to do and carry out feminist research. We will focus on how feminist scholards challenge dominant theories of knowledge and the major methodologies employed in the social sciences and humanities.
Through lectures and workshops, we will ask how feminist theory shapes the kinds of research questions we ask, the types of materials we use, the methodologies we choose, and how we define our relationships with our subject/materials. Students are expected to conduct a short pre-assignment, actively participate in the workshop discussion, and critically reflect throughtout the course.

Learning objectives
After the course, the student will be able to
- Plan and carry out a larger research project utilising feminist research methodologies
- Reflect upon the limits of conventional knowledge production in academia
- Gain practical and creative skills to produce diverse forms of knowledge
- Discuss politics of gender, race, class and sexuality in cross-cultural contexts
- Recognise the diverse historical, cultural and political trajectories and forms of feminist politics
- Critically engage with intersectional research methods and theories

Course format and teaching methods
Lectures, workshops and excursions. The interdiciplinary teaching methods combine traditional learning methods and feminist research methodologies, such as art, college marking, and poetry. The students require no practical experience of art making or doing feminist research.

Teachers

Merle Weßel (PhD), is an assistant professor in Nordic history at the University of Greifswald/ Germany. Her doctoral dissertation "Un Unholy Union? Eugenic Feminism in the Nordic Countries, ca. 1890-1940" (2018) discusses the engagement of Nordic feminists into eugenic debates and the use of eugenic rhetoric in the fight for female empowerment.
She has co-edited the anthology "Conceptualising Public Health. Historical and Contemporary Struggles over Key Concepts", published by Routledge (2018) and published articles about castration, race and feminist topics in for example Scandinavian Journal of History. Her main research interests are gender and cultural history as well as medical humanities.

Cai Weaver M.Soc.Sci is a Doctoral Candidate at the Department of Political and Economic Studies, University of Helsinki. His PhD research focuses on issues of Biopoliticial Governance, (Homo)Sexuality, and Russia. Weaver's other research interests are Feminist Research Methods, Nationalism, and Gender and Politics in Video Games. For the academic years 2018-19 and 2017-18, he is responsible for teaching the Master's Seminar Course "Gender and Politics in Europe" and the Bachelor's Lecture Course "Gender, Politics and Society". He has also taught on the Master's course "Exploring Politics of Gender and Sexuality across the Finnish-Russian Border" at the University of Tampere in Autumn 2016. He has published in Idäntutkimus The Finnish Review of East European Studies and has a forthcoming article in Sexualities He has organised and chaired panels at various international conferences. 
https://researchportal.helsinki.fi/en/persons/091985fd-37ed-4f23-bdb1-1e...  

10th INTERNATIONAL NORDWEL SUMMER SCHOOL:STATE, SOCIETY & CITIZEN - CROSS-DISCIPLINARY PERSPECTIVES ON WELFARE STATE DEVELOPMENT

University of Helsinki, 13-17 August 2018 

Welfare states can be studied with a number of theoretical and methodological approaches, from various chronological perspectives and with a focus on different empirical phenomena. The summer school aims to stimulate discussions across disciplines and foster innovative cross-disciplinary research on the development of welfare states over time. The summer school brings together PhD students and well-established international scholars in scientific exchange.

We invite PhD students from different disciplinary backgrounds to participate in the discussion on the development of welfare states, their preconditions, present status and how we ought to study them. PhD Students present their papers in parallel sessions and get feedback from senior scholars and junior colleagues.

The list of teachers include Romana Careja (University of Southern Denmark), Patrick Emmenegger (University of St. Gallen), Olli Kangas (The Social Insurance Institution of Finland – Kela), Herbert Obinger (University of Bremen), Noel Whiteside (University of Warwick), Helena Blomberg-Kroll (University of Helsinki), Pauli Kettunen (University of Helsinki), Åsa Lundqvist (Lund University), Pirjo Markkola (University of Tampere), Paul Marx (University of Duisburg-Essen) and Klaus Petersen (University of Southern Denmark).

We welcome applications by PhD students, including a paper proposal and a short description of the phase of their studies, by 31 March 2018. The approved proposals will be selected on the basis of their quality. Papers can be written from a broad historical or contemporary perspective and come from different disciplines such as history, social policy, sociology, political science, and political philosophy. Guidelines for papers will be sent in connection with the letters of approval by 30 April 2018. Participants who complete the summer school successfully are credited with 5 ECTS.

Prepare for postdoc -afternoon 

23th March 2018

SKY -doctoral programme is organising a PREPARE FOR POSTDOC afternoon event, intended for those SKY students who are approaching the end their PhD studies, and are wondering what next. We will explore, and inform about, the various possibilities for fresh PhD’s inside and outside of academia, and discuss the current ideas of an ideal postdoc period. Some ex-SKY PhD students, who are well in their postdoc period will tell about their experiences.  

2017

WorldGender -course

and Marta Segarra’s public talk: “‘Show Me the Place’: New Forms of Kinship in a Posthuman World”  28–30 Nov 2017
This PhD course concentrates on the ongoing work of participating PhD students, which will be commented on by the three teachers and by the co-students of the course with the aim of helping the PhD students to advance and complete their dissertation projects with high quality. The expertise of the three teachers is in a wide area of feminist thought, as well as in studying gender and sexuality in different cultural contexts. The focus of the course is on the worldwide transfer of feminist ideas, concepts, and ideals, which travel from one cultural context to another other, and in particular in the conflicts of ideals and practices in those transfers, such as those in between western to non-western contexts of change in gender and sexuality. The teachers are prepared to comment work which tackles with conflicts zones and paradoxes of the crossing ideals concerning feminist change and practices of gender and sexuality, whether approached in terms of theoretical discussions, study of literature or art, or in terms of empirical social research. Teachers cover a large area of methodological approaches and the literature on the course comprises scholarship ranging from the transatlantic transfer of feminist ideas to the core postcolonial feminist literature.

The Teachers:

Marta Segarra is a Research Professor at the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), and a member of the Laboratoire d’études de genre et de sexualité‒Research Center on Gender and Sexuality Studies (LEGS). She is also a Professor of Gender Studies and French Studies at the University of Barcelona (Spain), where she co-founded and directed (1994-2013) the Center for Women and Literature (now Theory, Gender, Sexuality). She also directed the Unesco Chair on Women, Development and Cultures (2004-2015). She has published in the fields of Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies, Francophone Maghrebi Studies, contemporary French literature and cinema, biopolitics and posthumanism, for journals such as New Literary History, Mosaic, Contemporary French and Francophone Studies/Sites, or Paragraph. Her books include: Teoría de los cuerpos agujereados (Porous Bodies: A Theory, 2014), Differences in Common: Gender, Vulnerabilty and Community (co-ed. with J. Sabadell-Nieto, 2014), Demenageries. Thinking (of) Animals after Derrida (co-ed. with A. E. Berger, 2011), The Portable Cixous (ed., 2010), and Traces du désir (Traces of Desire, 2008).

Tuija Pulkkinen is professor of Gender Studies at the University of Helsinki. Her work moves in a large area of philosophy, history and politics, and she has published on political thought, democratic theory, conceptual change, and the study of gender and sexuality. Her publications include The Postmodern and Political Agency (2000), and the co-edited volume The Ashgate Research Companion to The Politics of Democratization in Europe. Concepts and Histories (2008). She has edited (with Kimberly Hutchings) Hegel’s Philosophy and Feminist Thought. Beyond Antigone?  (2010), and (with Antu Sorainen)  Siveellisyydestä seksuaalisuuteen – poliittisen käsitteen historia [From Sittlichkeit to Sexuality – the History of a Political Concept]  (2011). She is currently working on a project on the politics of philosophy in contemporary feminist theory.

Patricia Scalco is a social anthropologist and a postdoctoral researcher currently based at the University of Helsinki. She earned her PhD from the University of Manchester and her doctoral research, currently being transformed into a monograph, explored the intersections of gender and sexual moralities in the delineation of private and public spaces in contemporary Istanbul.  Patricia lived and conducted extensive fieldwork in Istanbul since 2006, earning her MA in Social Anthropology from Yeditepe University. She is an Early Career Researcher member of the Editorial Board of the Sociological Review and as a fellow of the Academy of Finland, her postdoctoral project gives continuity to the study of space, place and gender in the area of the Grand Bazaar, in Istanbul.

"Transforming Working Life, Gender and Care"

4.-5.12.2017

This SKY course for doctoral students aims to:

  • Introduce students to the central issues in designing and carrying out gender research at postgraduate level and beyond.
  • Consider recent debates on gender and feminist research on the concepts of working life and care.
  • Examine what difference it makes to take gender and intersecting differences as the subject or object of research.

Of particular concern are the ethical and political issues arising from doing gender research with respect to representing others and seeking to influence and engage with broader social contexts. The course is interdisciplinary, and you will be introduced to a range of perspectives on knowledge production and research practice.

As a result of participating in this course you should be equipped to:

  • Critically assess existing knowledge practices.
  • Identify challenges to 'mainstream knowledge' that come from gendered and feminist perspectives.
  • Explore how knowledge is produced and offer critical assessments of the dominant debates in gendered research practice, asking how we ensure that we conduct research ethically.

Through a discussion on methodological questions, the course provides an opportunity to reflect on and synthesize a range of research design issues. These are addressed on the course through producing and collectively evaluating student designed research proposals and papers.

The course is highly participatory and you are encouraged to bring key questions, issues and texts from your own research and reading that we can consider as a group. For each participant, one hour of time will be reserved for presentation of one’s paper, discussion and comments.

Teachers:

Linda McKie is Professor of Sociology and Social Policy at the University of Edinburgh where she is Dean and Head of the School for Social and Political Sciences. She joined Edinburgh after completing five years at the University of Durham where she was Head of the School of Applied Social Sciences, Durham University, UK. She is also an Associate Director of the Centre for Research on Families and Relationships, University of Edinburgh. Linda has published over 120 peer reviewed articles, books and chapters and been a member of the editorial boards for a range of journals including Sociology, Sociology of Health and Illness, and Work, Employment and Society. Linda is passionate in her support for early career colleagues and runs regular writing courses and retreats on planning and writing publications and research proposals. In 2004 she was elected to the UK Academy of Social sciences and was a member of the Sociology Unit of Assessment Panel for the UK Research Assessment Framework in 2014.

Marjut Jyrkinen is Associate Professor in Work-life Equality and Gender Studies at the University of Helsinki (UH). She has her PhD in Management and Organisation studies, Hanken School of Economics, and Docentship in Faculty of Social Sciences, UH. Her current research interests are in the areas of sustainability and intersectionalities in working life, and research on gender, management and organisations. She has over 65 scientific publications including 40 peer reviewed articles. Marjut is Co-director of the SKY Doctoral Programme and Research Director of WeAll Research Consortium (weallfinland.fi).

Jukka Lehtonen is a Senior Researcher in Gender Studies at the University of Helsinki, Finland. He currently works on workplace diversity and equality issues in WeAll –project (weallfinland.fi) funded by the Academy of Finland. His research focus is on media discourses on intersecting differences and normativities in the working life as well as on non-heterosexual and trans youth with in education and work environment. Sexual and gender diversity within school, workplace, youth culture and research have been his research topics for over 25 years. He has over 100 scientific publications including five monographs and 10 edited compilation works.

Feminist reading group in social and political theory

The purpose of this course is to get acquainted with key texts in feminist social, political and legal theory broadly conceived and to help students apply relevant theories to their own doctoral research. The course is also open as a reading group/seminar even if one does not need to obtain ECTS credits. The content of the course will be designed to connect with the research and theoretical interests of the participants.

The course has the form of a reading group with seminar sessions where theory and research by the participants is connected. The readings may comprise keys issues in feminist theory connected to, for example, subjectivity in society, politics and law; class, ethnicity and intersectional concerns; sexuality and reproduction and materialism and affect, or any other key issues in classical or contemporary feminist thinking that participants wish to address in a systematic and structured manner.
 
The group convenes approximately once a month, there being 5-6 sessions per term. For each session, participants will read designated texts and research paper/s by other participants, or a selection of designated texts. In order to obtain 4 credits, one must participate in the majority of sessions during one term (absence may be amended with extra writing tasks), read about 500 pages of literature and papers by fellow participants and write a literature review of 10-15 pages. 1 extra credit (5 credits in total) may be obtained by writing an additional essay based on the literature review.
Teacher/Contact person
Linda Hart, D.Soc.Sc, linda.hart(at)helsinki.fi

Writing history from the perspectives of gender and the body

Nov21st -23rd, 2017

The workshop examines feminist and queer approaches to the historiography, especially that of the arts and music. The aim of the workshop is to help individual students  form their research questions and arguments, using methods and theoretical models drawn from recent "intersectional" scholarship on the interaction of gendered and raced alterities, as well as from history, historical studies of the arts, musicology, ethnomusicology, anthropology and sound studies. Special emphasis will be on the interpretation of historical data as articulations of or evidence about gendered and raced distributions of power in the past.

Teachers:

Suzanne G. Cusick, Professor of Music on the Faculty of Arts and Science at New York University has published extensively on gender and sexuality in relation to the musical cultures of early modern Italy and of contemporary North America, including in the collections Musicology and Difference, Queering the Pitch, and Audible Traces. Her feminist readings of early modern music and musical culture have appeared in JAMS, Early Music, The Cambridge Companion to Monteverdi, and the Brazilian journal Per Musi. Revista Academica de Musica. Cusick's book, Francesca Caccini at the Medici Court: Music and the Circulation of Power (Chicago, 2009), received the 2010 book prize of the Society for the Study of Early Modern Women. In 2003-2012  she was the main editor of Women and Music. A Journal of Gender of Culture, the first journal  focused on the relationship of gender and sexuality to musical culture. She currently studies the use of noise, music and "gender coercion" in the detention and interrogation of prisoners held during the 21st-century's "war on terror," work for which she received the Philip Brett Award given by the LGBTQ Study Group of the American Musicological Society in 2007.

Pirkko Moisala works as the professor of musicology and ethnomusicology at the University of Helsinki. Her recently concluded project aimed at renewing methods and approaches of music research with the help of the radical process philosophy of Gilles Deleuze and her collaborator Felix  Guattari (see http://www.helsinki.fi/deleuzian/  and Musical Encounters with Deleuze and Guattari). Moisala’s areas of expertise are music anthropology (ethnomusicology) as well as gender and cultural studies of music. Her publications within gender studies include Kaija Saariaho, Music and Gender, Gender and Qualitative Methods, and Musiikin toinen sukupuoli (The Other Sex of Music).

Thinking Queer Temporality

Sept 25th 10-16 and Dr. Gunkel's Christina lecture 26th 16-18

PhD workshop on queer-feminist strategies for alternative engagements: PhD students are welcome to a one-day workshop on how to analyze unconventional thinking, writing or images – how to engage with utopian, alternative, disruptive or in different ways creative materials/data so that our scholarly and critical practices open rather than close possible opportunities for imaginative interventions? Does academic scholarship allow for engagements beyond the understanding, dissecting, oppositional or otherwise taming practices, and how?

This is a non-competative, low-threshold-participation workshop: one can come with any topic, material and paper, as long as one is interested in alternative forms of articulating resistance. Participants are encouraged to provide 3-10 page papers or discussion pieces and a short summary of their projects, and an excerpt from their data for all of us to discuss. Each participant's work and questions gets equal amount of time to be spent on the topic, but the pedagogy of the workshop is to freely discuss rather than mere listen to presentations. Participants who do not wish to provide a paper can attend by discussing only, but everyone should read all the provided materials.

Teachers:
Henriette Gunkel, Department of Visual Cultures at Goldsmiths, University of London.
Elina Oinas, Soc&kom, sociology, University of Helsinki

Writing feminist research: practices to enhance style, argumentation and self-reflectivity -workshop

Teachers Erszebet Strausz, University of Warwick and Elina Penttinen, University of Helsinki

Includes public talk "Creativity as strategy and subversion in the neoliberal university: experiments in critical pedagogy, narrative research, and public engagement" by  Erszebet Strausz

Writing a doctoral thesis in the contemporary context of neoliberalist university politics, uncertainty and efficiency may add pressure to research and the writing process. In this workshop our goal is to address the challenges and tensions in writing feminist research and find practices to enhance one’s own argumentation, confidence in research and articulation.

A key element in feminist research ethics is self-reflectivity and recognition of power relations within academic practices. Actualizing these demands, however, may be difficult to do in practice. What does it mean to be self-reflective? How much are we supposed to write ourselves into the text: what makes personal reflection effective without being ‘too much’? What are the political implications of engaging with our situatedness in the field we study for the power relations that we engage with and seek to challenge? We will collectively explore ways to build one’s own argument and attain the goals of scientific research without getting lost in the process and with a view of nurturing new forms of writing, creativity and narrative that may unfold from these practices.

This workshop draws on critical pedagogy to enhance awareness of the ‘politics’ of research and introduces creative analytic writing as a method to bring clarity to individual research trajectories and offer alternatives to the implicit masculinism and power implications of scientific writing. The session showcases exercises from the creative analytic writing field and demonstrates how these may help to gain new insights into some of the core questions of one’s own research. The aim is not to dismiss the logico-scientific approach but rather to assist everyone in finding and refining their own writing style and academic expression.

Feminist Readings symposium

Friday, 26th of May at  2017

Research – Creativity –  Activism

Welcome to the third edition of the international Feminist Readings symposium. This time we convene in Helsinki! 

This symposium is intent on starting discussions about the potential of bringing together research, creativity and activism. Our selection of presentations comes from young researchers. The focus is on writing, which we understand broadly as giving form to ideas and creating connections. Writing is a process, often necessary for the realisation of an idea, a manifestation of the act of thinking.

During the two-day symposium we ask could creative writing and other creative methods allow more  diverse ways to do research and approach feminism? What do creativity and innovation mean in relation to research if doing research is always already creative, yet often represented as separate from artistic activity? Is it possible to write and do research differently or against the grain, challenging conventions of the academic, artistic, and activist mainstream? How could different situated knowledges question the white malestream?

In addition to our wonderful program of papers, we have two keynote lectures by the following people:

Akila Kizzi (University of Paris 8)
Heta Rundgren (University of Helsinki & University of Paris 8)

SKY Journal afternoon 11.4.2017

This event aims to answer the questions doctoral candidates may have about publishing in journals. The programme includes short presentations held by both senior and junior researchers. This is a good opportunity to share experiences and tips, and learn more about journals in which to publish your research on gender!

We wish participation of researchers at different stages of their careers, and participants are invited to give very short presentations on the following questions: 

1)    In which journals do I publish my research on gender and sexuality ?  In which journals would I like to publish?  Which journals do I read?  Why? 

2)     A memorable story on my experiences in journal publishing.

3)     My best tip for journal publishing

Feminist reading group in social and political theory

The purpose of this course is to get acquainted with key texts in feminist social, political and legal theory broadly conceived and to help students apply relevant theories to their own doctoral research. The course is also open as a reading group/seminar even if one does not need to obtain ECTS credits. The content of the course will be designed to connect with the research and theoretical interests of the participants.
 
The course has the form of a reading group with seminar sessions where theory and research by the participants is connected. The readings may comprise keys issues in feminist theory connected to, for example, subjectivity in society, politics and law; class, ethnicity and intersectional concerns; sexuality and reproduction and materialism and affect, or any other key issues in classical or contemporary feminist thinking that participants wish to address in a systematic and structured manner.
 
Teacher/Contact person
Linda Hart, D.Soc.Sc, linda.hart(at)helsinki.fi

2016

SKY doctoral course:  Gender, Sexuality, Feminism, and Queer in post-Soviet Russia and in Eastern Europe

9th December 2016

The Teachers:
Anna Temkina is Professor of the Sociology of Public Health and Gender, and co-coordinator of the Gender Studies Program at the European University in St Petersburg, Russia. With a Ph.D. in Sociology (University of Helsinki), she studies contemporary changes in attitudes and practices concerning gender and sexuality in Russian post-Soviet society. Temkina is an expert of feminist theory, social theory from gender perspective, sociology of health and medicine, and on qualitative methods in sociological research.

Elena Zdravomyslova is Professor at the Department of Political Science and Sociology and co-cordinator of the Gender Studies Program at the European University in St Petersburg, Russia. She is an expert on modes of gender in post-Soviet society, women’s social activism, care and emotional work from a feminist perspective, and on reproductive health (institutions and practices).

Tuija Pulkkinen is professor of Gender Studies at the University of Helsinki. She works in the area of philosophy, history, and politics, and on feminist and queer scholarship. She has published on political thought and democratic theory; on nationalism; on conceptual change, and on history of feminism and gender and queer studies.

Katja Kahlina is Marie Skłodowska-Curie Fellow in Gender Studies at the University of Helsinki. Her work focuses on the ways in which gender and sexual politics intersect with nationalism and (neoliberal) globalisation, as well as with social institutions and categories of citizenship, nationality, ethnicity, and, most recently, religion. Her current research deals with anti-LGBT movements in Croatia and Serbia.

Day of Daring - Lecture and workshop

September 22th 2016

Dr. Saara Särmä is the co-founder and president of Feminist think thank Hattu and the creator of “Congrats, you have an all male panel!” website.  Her doctoral dissertation in International Relations (2014) titled Junk Feminism and Nuclear Wannabes – Collaging Parodies of Iran and North Korea focused on internet parody images and developed a unique and innovative art-based collage methodology for studying world politics.  She’s interested in politics of visuality, feminist academic activism, and laughter in world politics. Together with her co-conspirators in Hattu, she aims to smash the patriarchy through the means of radical fun. Hattu has developed successful and empowering concepts such as the School of Daring and Swearing Soirees.

How to study categorizations, classifications and gendered governance

The key note speakers:
Professor Hanne Marlene Dahl (political science, gender studies), Roskilde University, http://rucforsk.ruc.dk/site/person/hmdahl
“Power, care and gendered governance”

Professor Theresa Wobbe, University of Potsdam (history, sociology of gender), https://www.uni-potsdam.de/geschlechtersoziologie/team/prof-dr-theresa-w...
"How sexual classification works in labour, law, and politics: The case of the International Labour Organization, 1919-2010"

Queer(y)ing Kinship, Family and Sexuality

7-8th November 2016 including the lecture by Professor Joanna Mizielinska: "Families of Choice in Poland" 

The Teachers:
Ulrika Dahl is Associate Professor of Gender Studies at Uppsala University and PhD program coordinator in Gender Studies and researcher at the Centre for Baltic and Eastern European Studies, Södertörn University, Sweden. She has written and taught widely in the areas of lesbian and queer kinship, gender theory and sexualities, critical femininity studies and on questions of fieldwork methodologies, creative writing, and femme-inist approaches to science. She is the author of Femmes of Power: Exploding Queer Femininities (Serpent's Tail 2008, with Del LaGrace Volcano) and Skamgrepp: Femme-inistiska Essäer (Leopard 2014) as well as of numerous articles in journals such as Gender, Place and Culture, NORA, New Formations, Feminist Theory (forthcoming), and in a range of anthologies. Ulrika is senior editor of lambda Nordica and associate editor of European Journal of Women's Studies. She currently directs 'Queer(y)ing Kinship in the Baltic Region', a research project funded by the Baltic Sea Foundation.

Joanna Mizielinska is Associate Professor at the Institute of Psychology of the Polish Academy of Sciences and Principal Investigator of the project Families of Choice in Poland (2013-2016),which is the first multi-method project on non-heterosexual families in Poland. Her work moves in a large area of intimate relations, gender and sexual politics, and she has published widely on queer families, empirical studies on relatedness, post-social sexualities and translations of queer theory. Specialist on the CEE sexualities, she works currently on the politics of family in Anglo-Saxon queer theory. She is an expert in LGBTIQ issues, conducting qualitative and quantitative research which demanded close co-operation with various LGBTIQ groups and organisations. Previously she worked for the University of Social Sciences and Humanities from 2006-2013 as an Associate Professor at the Institute of Sociology (2009-2013) and as a Director of that Institute (2012). She was a Fullbright scholar at Princeton University, where she worked under the supervision of Professor Judith Butler. Joanna has also been a visiting researcher in the Helsinki University as well as in Sweden. She has published the book Families of choice in Poland. Family life of nonheterosexual persons (with Marta Abramowicz and Agata Stasińska, 2015), co-edited De-Centring Western Sexualities: Central and Eastern European Perspective (with Robert Kulpa, 2011) and edited a special issue of lambda nordica "in transition?: central/eastern European sexualities" (2012).

Antu Sorainen is an Academy Fellow at the Academy of Finland and Docent in Gender Studies at the University of Helsinki. She has conducted empirical studies in the area of queer domesticities and intimate economies, and published work on law and sexualities, politics of sexualized concepts, as well as on queer history and genealogy. She is the co-author of Siveellisyydestä Seksuaalisuuteen (From Decency to Sexuality) with Tuija Pulkkinen and has published recently on queer inheritance practices. She currently holds a five-year Academy of Finland Fellowship for a project entitled "Wills and Inheritance Practices in Sexually Marginalised Groups" (2014-2019), and a major research team grant for a four-year Academy of Finland project "CoreKin – Contrasting and Re-Imagining Margins of Kinship" (2016-2020).

DEMOCRATIC THEORY AND GENDERED PRACTICES

Joint Doctoral Course of Political, Societal and Regional Change PRSC and Gender, Culture and Society doctoral programmes at 30-31st May, 2016

Keynote speakers:
Professor Yvonne Galligan (Queen’s University, Belfast): Interrogating the quality of democracy: Feminist insights

Professor Birte Siim (University of Aalborg): Reframing democracy ‒ intersectional and transnational challenges

Academy Researcher Johanna Kantola (University of Helsinki): Party politics - a challenge or a possibility to gender equality?

Professor Anne Maria Holli (University of Helsinki): Who represents women? Theoretical and empirical insights from a study on the corporatist structures in Finnish public policy-making

What Does Literature Do for Feminist Politics? -workshop

at 18-20th April, 2016 including public lecture by Suzanne Bost (Professor, Loyola University, Chicago. Department of English) "Memoir Beyond the Self: Animal, Vegetable, and Digital Ecologies in the Work of Aurora Levins Morales"

Teachers
Suzanne Bost is Professor of English, and Graduate Program Director in Women’s and Gender Studies, at Loyola University Chicago.  She is the author of two books, Mulattas and Mestizas: Representing Mixed Identities in the Americas, 1850-2000 (which examines the role of racial mixture in the development of American identity politics) and Encarnación: Illness and Body Politics in Chicana Feminist Literature (which analyzes the premodern Mesoamerican sources that enable Mexican American writers to celebrate permeable embodiment as a feminist ideal).  She has also co-edited, with Frances Aparicio, The Routledge Companion to Latino/a Literature, and has published more than a dozen articles on Latina/o literature, feminist theory, illness and disability, archival research, transnational comparison, food, music, and yoga.  Her current book project focuses on posthumanism and Latina/o memoir.

Elina Penttinen is a university lecturer in Gender Studies, University of Helsinki. Currently she is the project leader of multidisciplinary feminist research project on experience of violence and healing. Her expertise is in feminist methodologies and creative analytics writing. She has published extensively in feminist International relations, experience of war and violence, gender and international crisis management and global political economy. She is the author two books, Joy as a new methodology for International Relations (which develops new methodology for feminist International relations based on posthumanism, positive psychology and scientific study of mindfulness) and Globalization, prostitution and sex-trafficking: a corporeal politics (which explores how globalization produces gendered and ethnicized subjectivities). She is also a pioneer in integrating contemplative practices in university pedagogy. Her current research interests are Intimate Partner Violence, emotional abuse, posthumanism, mindfulness and mindful self-compassion.

2015

Sexuality in the Context of Feminist Understandings of Gender

December 10th and 11th 2015
Joint Course for SKY and The Doctoral Programme in Social Sciences

Teacher: Professor Sue Scott (FAcSS), Centre for Women’s Studies, University of York (UK) and Visiting Professor, University of Helsinki

SKY workshop in Budapest 5.-6. November, 2015  

Joint Doctoral Workshop: SKY - Central European University Gender Studies - GSDP
Responsible organizers: Professor Elissa Helms (Head of Gender Studies, CEU), and prof. Tuija Pulkkinen UH/SKY/GSDP).

How to study categorizations, classifications and gendered governance 

Keynote speakers:
Professor Hanne Marlene Dahl (political science, gender studies), Roskilde University, http://rucforsk.ruc.dk/site/person/hmdahl “Power, care and gendered governance”

Professor Theresa Wobbe, University of Potsdam (history, sociology of gender), https://www.uni-potsdam.de/geschlechtersoziologie/team/prof-dr-theresa-w...
“Work and non-work – the ILO’s labour force concept as a case”

SKY doctoral course: Feminism and Capitalism

22–24th September 2015

Teachers:
Cinzia Arruzza (Assistant Professor, Department of Philosophy, The New School for Social Research, USA). Professor Arruzza’s areas of expertise include: Gender and social reproduction, Ancient Metaphysics and political thought, Neoplatonism. Her research projects and publications can be found at http://www.newschool.edu/nssr/faculty.aspx?id=52618
https://nssr.academia.edu/CinziaArruzza/Papers

Johanna Oksala (Academy of Finland Research Fellow, Department of Philosophy, History, Culture and Art Studies, University of Helsinki). Dr. Oksala’s areas of expertise include: Political Philosophy, Contemporary and 20th C European Philosophy, Feminist Philosophy, Foucault, Phenomenology. Her publications can be found at https://tuhat.halvi.helsinki.fi/portal/en/persons/johanna-oksala(40398368-50d7-440f-9f25-f0706ee01259).html

ETHNOGRAPHY AND CULTURAL ANALYSIS WITH THE SPECIAL EMPHASIZE ON THE ARTS

September 8 -10, 2015

Visiting Scholar: Professor Ellen Koskoff, Eastman School of Music, USA
Responsible Tutor:  Professor Pirkko Moisala, Helsinki University

Teachers:
Ellen Koskoff is a professor of ethnomusicology at the University of Rochester’s Eastman School of Music and director of the ethnomusicology programs there. Her writings about Jewish music, gender and music, and music cognition are widely published. Her work includes Women and Music in Cross-Cultural Perspective (1987), and Music in Lubavitcher Life (2000), winner of the 2002 ASCAP Deems-Taylor award. Her most recent book, A Feminist Ethnomusicology, (University of Illinois Press, 2014) examines a life of research on music and gender. She is a contributor to the New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians, is the general editor of the Garland Encyclopedia of World Music, vol. 3, “The United States and Canada,” and the series editor of the University of Rochester Press’s Eastman/Rochester Studies in Ethnomusicology. She is a former President of the Society for Ethnomusicology and is currently serving as the editor of the Society’s journal, Ethnomusicology.

Pirkko Moisala works as the professor of musicology and ethnomusicology at Helsinki University. Her current project “Deleuzian Music Research” (funded by the Academy of Finland) aims at renewing methods and approaches of music research with the help of the radical process philosophy of Gilles Deleuze and her collaborator Felix Guattari (see http://www.helsinki.fi/deleuzian/). Moisala’s special areas are music anthropology (ethnomusicology) as well as gender and cultural studies of music. Methodologically, her expertise lies in the ethnographic study of musical practices, performance studies, as well as the study of life stories.  Moisala has published widely in gender studies of music, for instance, “Gender and Music” (edited together with B. Diamond), “Gender and Qualitative Methods” (written together with H. Järviluoma and A. Vilkko), as well as “Musiikin toinen sukupuoli” (The Other Sex of Music; biographies of women composers through the ages, written together with R. Valkeila). She has also authored a book on composer Kaija Saariaho.

SKY doctoral course:  Interpreting Feminist Thinkers

12–13th May 2015

The course includes the lecture by Professor Moya Lloyd:  "Vulnerability, Grievability, and the Body”

The Teachers:
Moya Lloyd is Professor of Political Theory at Loughborough University, UK. She has written widely in the area of feminist political theory, particularly on the work of Judith Butler, as well as on questions of identity politics, sexuality, radical democracy, and the body. She is the author of Beyond Identity Politics: feminism, power, and politics (2005) and Judith Butler: from norms to politics (2007), and the editor of the forthcoming volume Butler and Ethics (2015). She is a former Deputy Director of the Centre for the Advancement of Women in Politics at Queen’s University, Belfast. She currently holds a three-year Leverhulme Major Research Fellowship for a project entitled: ‘Who counts? The political problem of the “human”’.

Tuija Pulkkinen is academy professor and professor of Gender Studies at the University of Helsinki. Her work moves in a large area of philosophy, history and politics, and she has published on political thought, democratic theory, conceptual change, genealogy and performativity of gender. Specialist on Judith Butler, Elizabeth Grozs, and Hannah Arendt, she works currently on the politics of philosophy in feminist theory. Her publications include The Postmodern and Political Agency (2000), and the edited volumes The Ashgate Research Companion to The Politics of Democratization in Europe. Concepts and Histories (2008); Hegel’s Philosophy and Feminist Thought: Beyond Antigone? and Siveellisyydestä seksuaalisuuteen – poliittisen käsitteen historia [From Sittlichkeit to Sexuality – the History of a Political Concept] (2011).

Re-thinking Public and Private: Gender, Justice, Violence and Violations

28.-29.4.2015

Teachers:
Linda McKie is Professor of Sociology at the School of Applied Social Sciences, Durham University, UK. She is also an Associate Director of the Centre for Research on Families and Relationships, University of Edinburgh. Linda has published over 120 peer reviewed articles, books and chapters and been a member of the editorial boards for a range of journals including Sociology, Sociology of Health and Illness, and Work, Employment and Society. Linda is passionate in her support for early career colleagues and runs regular writing courses and retreats on planning and writing publications and research proposals. In 2004
she was elected to the UK Academy of Social sciences and was a member of the Sociology Unit of Assessment Panel for the UK Research Assessment Framework in 2014.

Marjut Jyrkinen is Professor in Gender Studies 2012-15 at University of Helsinki (UH). She has her PhD in Management and Organisation studies, Hanken School of Economics, and Docentship in Faculty of Social Sciences, UH. Her current research interests are in the areas of globalisation, violations and violence, intersectionalities and worklife, and research on gender, management and organisations. Marjut is Co-director of the SKY Doctoral Programme.

2014

How to Study History of Sexuality and Gender

3-5th November 2014

Teachers:
Dr Matt Cook is Senior Lecturer in History and Gender Studies at Birkbeck, University of London, a Co-director of the Raphael Samuel History Centre, and an editor of History Workshop Journal. He is the author of London and the Culture of Homosexuality, 1885 – 1914 (2003), lead author and editor of A Gay History of Britain (2007), Queer Domesticities (2014), and co-editor of Queer 1950s (2012; with Heike Bauer) and Queer Cities, Queer Cultures (2014; with Jennifer Evans).

Dr Antu Sorainen is Docent in Gender Studies and Academy Research Fellow at the University of Helsinki. Her research project Wills and Inheritance in Sexually Marginalized Groups 2014-2019 looks at how queer people organize their care and support relations, and whether they write wills on the benefit of their “chosen” kin, lovers and friends. Sorainen has published on the history of sexual criminal law and non-heterosexual urban history. She co-authored a book on the conceptual history of Sittlichkeit with Tuija Pulkkinen (Siveellisyydestä seksuaalisuuteen, Finnish Literature Society 2011). Her chapter Two cities of Helsinki? One liberally gay and one practically queer? was published in Queer Cities, Queer Cultures, edited by Jennifer Evans and Matt Cook (2014).

SKY:n kirjoitusseminaari (10 op)

17.10.–12.12.2014 

Seminaarin vetäjänä toimii FT Eva Maria Korsisaari, joka on väitellyt feministisen filosofian ja feministisen kirjallisuudentutkimuksen alalta sekä toiminut aiemmin tutkijatohtorina ja yliopistonlehtorina (ma.) sukupuolentutkimuksen oppiaineen piirissä.

SKY Doctoral  course: Insights and reflections on empirical field work in studying young people

28th October – Wednesday 29th October includin  talk by Prof. Shane Blackman "Doing Ethnography with Young People: from description to theory".

Teachers: Professor Shane Blackman, Professor of Cultural Studies Department of Media, Art and Design at Canterbury Christ Church University, Kent, Professor Päivi Honkatukia, University of Tampere (Youth Studies), Professor Kristiina Brunila (Social Justice and Equality in Education, University of Helsinki).

Representation

30th September - 1st October 2014

Teachers
Beverley Skeggs (Professor in Sociology at Goldsmiths, University of London, UK). Professor Skeggs is sociologist, whose work includes influential studies on class and value. Her groundbreaking book Formations of Class and Gender: Becoming Respectable (1997) is a longitudinal ethnography of subjectivity which calls for the need to include class in theorisations of gender, identity and power. A continuation of this investigation is Class, Self, Culture (2004), which is a critique of the idea of self and an exploration of the different ways class still circulates as a form of value that is attaches to different bodies. Her more recent research includes a monograph Reacting to Reality TV: Audience, Performance, Value (2012) which investigates how different groups of women respond to television and challenges the conventional notion of reading representations and emphasizes affective reaction. Professor Skeggs is also the joint managing editor of the journal The Sociological Review.
http://www.gold.ac.uk/sociology/staff/skeggs/.

Annamari Vänskä (Collegium Researcher and Adjunct Professor, TIAS - The Institute for Advanced Studies, University of Turku). Vänskä is expert in fashion studies, visual culture, visualised consumer culture, contemporary art, critical gender theory and childhood studies. She is interested in exploring how commercial visual culture, especially advertising, is used in shaping and challenging identities, how clothes and their representations are read, and how images are used in identity construction. Vänskäs latest book Muodikas lapsuus. Lapset muotikuvissa (Fashionable Childhood. Children in fashion advertising, Gaudeamus 2012; forthcoming as English translation in 2015 via Bloomsbury Publishing) is an investigation of the multitude of ways in which advertising representing children are used for
affecting the consumer-viewers. http://www.annamarivanska.com.

Gender and Political Analysis

16-17 September 2014 including Emanuela Lombardo's talk 'The symbolic representation of gender'

Teachers:
Emanuela Lombardo is Associate Professor at the Department of Political Science and Administration II of Madrid Complutense University (Spain). Her research concerns gender equality policies, especially in the European Union and Spain, Europeanization, and gender and political representation. On these issues she has published articles in peer reviewed journals as well as chapters in edited volumes. Her last edited book, with Maxime Forest, is The Europeanization of Gender Equality Policies (Palgrave 2012) and her last monograph, authored with Petra Meier, is The Symbolic Representation of Gender (Ashgate 2014). For further information see http://www.ucm.es/info/target/

Johanna Kantola is Academy Research Fellow in Gender Studies at the University of Helsinki. Her research focuses on feminist theories of the state, gender and the European Union, representation, gender equality policies, state feminism, and intersectionality. Her books include Gender and the European Union (Palgrave, 2010) and Feminists Theorize the State (Palgrave, 2006). As an editor she has published Changing State Feminism (Palgrave, 2007, with Joyce Outshoorn), The Oxford Handbook on Gender and Politics (Oxford University Press, 2013, with Georgina Waylen, Karen Celis and Laurel Weldon), two edited volumes in Finnish, and a special issue of International Feminist Journal of Politics. She is the Editor of Palgrave Macmillan's Gender and Politics Book Series with Judith Squires. For further information see http://tuhat.halvi.helsinki.fi/portal/fi/person/jekantol

SKY doctoral course: Feminist Thought and Biopolitics

16-18th June 2014 including the lecture of Professor *Penelope Deutscher:"That Death Which is Not One: Woman as Exception in Derrida's /The Death Penalty/" *

The Teachers:
Penelope Deutscher is Professor in the Department of Philosophy and an affiliate of the Comparative Literary Studies and Gender and Sexualities programs at Northwestern University. She is the author of /The Philosophy of Simone de Beauvoir: Ambiguity, Conversion, Resistance/ (Cambridge U.P, 2008), /How to Read Derrida/ (Granta/Norton 2005), /A Politics of Impossible Difference: The Later Work of Luce Irigaray/ (Cornell U.P., 2002) and /Yielding Gender: Feminism, Deconstruction and the History of Philosophy /(Routledge 1997). She co-edited /Repenser le politique: l'apport du féminisme. /(co-edited, with**Françoise Collin, Campagne première/Les Cahiers du Grif, 2004) and /Enigmas: Essays on Sarah Kofman/, co-edited, with Kelly Oliver (Cornell U.P. 1999). In 2000 she was guest editor of a special issue of Hypatia, Contemporary French Women Philosophers. She is the coeditor of a forthcoming volume of essays on Foucault and Derrida with Columbia University Press, and completing work on /Foucault's Children: Biopolitics, Thanatopolitics, and Reproductive Futurism/.

Tuija Pulkkinen is academy professor and professor of Gender Studies at the University of Helsinki. Her work moves in a large area of philosophy, history and politics, and she has published on political thought, democratic theory, conceptual change, genealogy and performativity of gender. Specialist on Derrida and Foucault, on Judith Butler, Elizabeth Grozs, and Hannah Arendt, she works currently on the politics of philosophy in feminist theory. Her publications include /The Postmodern and Political Agency/ (2000), and the edited volumes /The Ashgate Research Companion to The Politics of Democratization in Europe. Concepts and Histories/ (2008); /Hegel's Philosophy and Feminist Thought: Beyond Antigone?/ and /Siveellisyydestä seksuaalisuuteen -- poliittisen käsitteen historia [From Sittlichkeit to Sexuality -- the History of a Political Concept] /(2011).

Third World Feminism and Post-Colonial Theory and Agency

26-28.5. 2014

The Teachers: 
Nefissa Naguib (Senior Researcher, Chr. Michelsen Institute, Norway; Professor II at the Institute for Social Anthropology at the University of Bergen). Anthropologist whose work links culture and history with politics. Her studies include themes such as culture and the moral economy of food and water; gender and religious minorities; faith-based activism; humanitarianism and military efforts. Her research projects and publications can be accessed http://www.cmi.no/staff/?nefissa-naguib

Susanne Dahlgren (Senior Lecturer, Development Studies, University of Helsinki). Anthropologist interested in legal anthropology, Islamic law, contemporary social movements, politics and revolution, and moralities of faith and religious practice. Her publications can be accessed https://tuhat.halvi.helsinki.fi/portal/en/persons/susanne-dahlgren%284c6...

Mulki Al-Sharmani (Academy Research Fellow, Comparative Religion, University of Helsinki). With PhD from Johns Hopkins University, her research focuses on Islamic feminism, Muslim family laws and legal activism, and refugees and diasporic communities. Her publications can be accessed https://tuhat.halvi.helsinki.fi/portal/en/persons/mulki-alsharmani%28751...

Feminist Theory and Feminist Politics

6-8.5. 2014 including Athena Athanasiou’s public talk: "Unthinkable Mourning: Counter-Memory and Feminist Political Subjectivity in Post-Yugoslavia." 

The Teachers:
Athena Athanasiou (Ass. Prof. of Anthropology Panteion University, Greece).  Anthropologist, who has published on feminist theory,  technologies of the  body, biopolitics, psychoanalysis, nationalism, postcoloniality, affect, feminist movements, 'Women in Black',  the Balkans, and Greece in crisis.   

Elena Tzelepis (Dr, Centre of Advance Study, Sofia), Specialist on continental philosophy, who has written on contemporary reading s of ancient philosophy, Irigaray and Antigone, the intersections of the political and the psychic, and the workings of critique. 

Tuija Pulkkinen (Academy professor, University of Helsinki, Gender Studies). Has published on political thought, nationalism, democratic theory and conceptual change;  and on genealogy and performativity of gender. Works currently on politics of philosophy within contemporary feminist theory.

SKY START: 1/14 Workshop Meeting

(5.-6. June 2014)  including lecture by professor PENELOPE DEUTSCHER (Nortwestern University) ‘That Death Which is Not One: Woman as Exception in Derrida’s The Death Penalty’

Penelope Deutscher is Professor in the Department of Philosophy and an affiliate of  the  Comparative Literary Studies and Gender and Sexualities programs at Northwestern University. She is the author of The Philosophy of Simone de Beauvoir: Ambiguity, Conversion, Resistance (Cambridge U.P, 2008),  How to Read Derrida (Granta/Norton 2005), A Politics of Impossible Difference: The Later Work of Luce Irigaray (Cornell U.P., 2002) and Yielding Gender: Feminism, Deconstruction and the History of Philosophy (Routledge 1997). She co-edited Repenser le  politique: l’apport du féminisme. (co-edited, with Françoise Collin, Campagne première/Les Cahiers du Grif, 2004) and  Enigmas: Essays on Sarah Kofman.,co-edited, with Kelly Oliver ( Cornell U.P. 1999). In 2000 she was guest editor of a special issue of Hypatia, Contemporary French Women Philosophers. She is the coeditor of a forthcoming volume of essays on Foucault and Derrida with Columbia University Press, and completing work on Foucault's Children: Biopolitics, Thanatopolitics, and Reproductive Futurism.

Open lunch time seminar

Emanuela Lombardo (Madrid, Complutense University, Spain) 
"Gender mainstreaming and policy responses to the economic crisis: The ‘unintended consequences’ of EU and national policymaking on Spanish gender equality policies"

Emanuela Lombardo,PhD in Politics at the University of Reading (UK), is Lecturer at the Department of Political Science and Administration II of Madrid Complutense University (Spain). She has worked as researcher in different European projects (European Commission FP4, FP5, and FP6, and POM Programs). Her research concerns gender equality policies, particularly in the European Union and Spain, gender mainstreaming, and gender and political representation. On these issues she has published articles in refereed journals and chapters in edited books. Her last book, edited with Maxime Forest, is The Europeanization of Gender Equality Policies (Palgrave 2012). Her forthcoming monograph, authored with Petra Meier, is The Symbolic Representation of Gender (Ashgate). For further information see http://www.ucm.es/info/target/

Are you working on a PhD thesis from a gender perspective?

SKY open seminar: 9.1.2014

This seminar is intended to the program's supervisors and to its potential PhD students who want to hear more about it and participate in planning it. You are warmly welcome to join us.

Welcome and introductions – Johanna Kantola, Gender Studies
Introduction to University of Helsinki Doctoral Programmes – Maija Urponen, Faculty of Arts
Introduction to SKY – Tuija Pulkkinen, Gender Studies
Discussion and Questions

Introduction to the session – Johanna Kantola, Gender Studies
Introduction to teaching, courses and supervision in SKY – Tuija Pulkkinen, Gender Studies
Discussion and feedback

How to Study History of Sexuality and Gender

3-5 November 2014

Teachers:
Dr Matt Cook is Senior Lecturer in History and Gender Studies at Birkbeck, University of London, a Co-director of the Raphael Samuel History Centre, and an editor of History Workshop Journal. He is the author of London and the Culture of Homosexuality, 1885 – 1914 (2003), lead author and editor of A Gay History of Britain (2007), Queer Domesticities (2014), and co-editor of Queer 1950s (2012; with Heike Bauer) and Queer Cities, Queer Cultures (2014; with Jennifer Evans).

Dr Antu Sorainen is Docent in Gender Studies and Academy Research Fellow at the University of Helsinki. Her research project Wills and Inheritance in Sexually Marginalized Groups 2014-2019 looks at how queer people organize their care and support relations, and whether they write wills on the benefit of their “chosen” kin, lovers and friends. Sorainen has published on the history of sexual criminal law and non-heterosexual urban history. She co-authored a book on the conceptual history of Sittlichkeit with Tuija Pulkkinen (Siveellisyydestä seksuaalisuuteen, Finnish Literature Society 2011). Her chapter Two cities of Helsinki? One liberally gay and one practically queer? was published in Queer Cities, Queer Cultures, edited by Jennifer Evans and Matt Cook (2014).

SKY:n kirjoitusseminaari

17.10.–12.12.2014 8 E, sh 223
Eva Korsisaari

Seminaarin vetäjänä toimii FT Eva Maria Korsisaari, joka on väitellyt feministisen filosofian ja feministisen kirjallisuudentutkimuksen alalta sekä toiminut aiemmin tutkijatohtorina ja yliopistonlehtorina (ma.) sukupuolentutkimuksen oppiaineen piirissä.

Insights and reflections on empirical field work in studying young people

28th October – 29th includin talk by Prof. Shane Blackman "Doing Ethnography with Young People: from description to theory".

Teachers: Professor Shane Blackman, Professor of Cultural Studies Department of Media, Art and Design at Canterbury Christ Church University, Kent, Professor Päivi Honkatukia, University of Tampere (Youth Studies), Professor Kristiina Brunila (Social Justice and Equality in Education, University of Helsinki).

Representation

30th September - 1st October 2014 including Beverley Skegg’s public talk “Reacting to Representation”

Teachers:
Beverley Skeggs (Professor in Sociology at Goldsmiths, University of London, UK). Professor Skeggs is sociologist, whose work includes influential studies on class and value. Her groundbreaking book Formations of Class and Gender: Becoming Respectable (1997) is a longitudinal ethnography of subjectivity which calls for the need to include class in theorisations of gender, identity and power. A continuation of this investigation is Class, Self, Culture (2004), which is a critique of the idea of self and an exploration of the different ways class still circulates as a form of value that is attaches to different bodies. Her more recent research includes a monograph Reacting to Reality TV: Audience, Performance, Value (2012) which investigates how different groups of women respond to television and challenges the conventional notion of reading representations and emphasizes affective reaction. Professor Skeggs is also the joint managing editor of the journal The Sociological Review.  http://www.gold.ac.uk/sociology/staff/skeggs/.

Annamari Vänskä (Collegium Researcher and Adjunct Professor, TIAS - The Institute for Advanced Studies, University of Turku). Vänskä is expert in fashion studies, visual culture, visualised consumer culture, contemporary art, critical gender theory and childhood studies. She is interested in exploring how commercial visual culture, especially advertising, is used in shaping and challenging identities, how clothes and their representations are read, and how images are used in identity construction. Vänskäs latest book Muodikas lapsuus.  Lapset muotikuvissa (Fashionable Childhood. Children in fashion advertising, Gaudeamus 2012; forthcoming as English translation in 2015 via Bloomsbury Publishing) is an investigation of the multitude of ways in which advertising representing children are used for
affecting the consumer-viewers. http://www.annamarivanska.com.

SKY doctoral course: Gender and Political Analysis (5 ECTS)

University of Helsinki, 16-17 September 2014

Teachers: Johanna Kantola (University of Helsinki) and Emanuela Lombardo (Complutense University, Madrid)

Emanuela Lombardo will give a talk titled 'The symbolic representation of gender' on 16 September 2014 at 14-16. In the workshop, on the 17 September 2014, we concentrate on the ongoing work of participating PhD students. The teachers Emanuela Lombardo and Johanna Kantola comment on student papers and encourage general discussion and debate on the key themes of the course in relation to them. The key aim is to help the PhD students to make high quality progress with their research.

About teachers:

Emanuela Lombardo is Associate Professor at the Department of Political Science and Administration II of Madrid Complutense University (Spain). Her research concerns gender equality policies, especially in the European Union and Spain, Europeanization, and gender and political representation. On these issues she has published articles in peer reviewed journals as well as chapters in edited volumes. Her last edited book, with Maxime Forest, is The Europeanization of Gender Equality Policies (Palgrave 2012) and her last monograph, authored with Petra Meier, is The Symbolic Representation of Gender (Ashgate 2014). For further information see http://www.ucm.es/info/target/

Johanna Kantola is Academy Research Fellow in Gender Studies at the University of Helsinki. Her research focuses on feminist theories of the state, gender and the European Union, representation, gender equality policies, state feminism, and intersectionality. Her books include Gender and the European Union (Palgrave, 2010) and Feminists Theorize the State (Palgrave, 2006). As an editor she has published Changing State Feminism (Palgrave, 2007, with Joyce Outshoorn), The Oxford Handbook on Gender and Politics (Oxford University Press, 2013, with Georgina Waylen, Karen Celis and Laurel Weldon), two edited volumes in Finnish, and a special issue of International Feminist Journal of Politics. She is the Editor of Palgrave Macmillan's Gender and Politics Book Series with Judith Squires. For further information see http://tuhat.halvi.helsinki.fi/portal/fi/person/jekantol

SKY doctoral course: Feminist Thought and Biopolitics (7,5 ECTS)

The Teachers:

Penelope Deutscher is Professor in the Department of Philosophy and an affiliate of the Comparative Literary Studies and Gender and Sexualities programs at Northwestern University. She is the author of /The Philosophy of Simone de Beauvoir: Ambiguity, Conversion, Resistance/ (Cambridge U.P, 2008), /How to Read Derrida/ (Granta/Norton 2005), /A Politics of Impossible Difference: The Later Work of Luce Irigaray/ (Cornell U.P., 2002) and /Yielding Gender: Feminism, Deconstruction and the History of Philosophy /(Routledge 1997). She co-edited /Repenser le politique: l'apport du féminisme. /(co-edited, with**Françoise Collin, Campagne première/Les Cahiers du Grif, 2004) and /Enigmas: Essays on Sarah Kofman/, co-edited, with Kelly Oliver (Cornell U.P. 1999). In 2000 she was guest editor of a special issue of Hypatia, Contemporary French Women Philosophers. She is the coeditor of a forthcoming volume of essays on Foucault and Derrida with Columbia University Press, and completing work on /Foucault's Children: Biopolitics, Thanatopolitics, and Reproductive Futurism/.

Tuija Pulkkinen is academy professor and professor of Gender Studies at the University of Helsinki. Her work moves in a large area of philosophy, history and politics, and she has published on political thought, democratic theory, conceptual change, genealogy and performativity of gender. Specialist on Derrida and Foucault, on Judith Butler, Elizabeth Grozs, and Hannah Arendt, she works currently on the politics of philosophy in feminist theory. Her publications include /The Postmodern and Political Agency/ (2000), and the edited volumes /The Ashgate Research Companion to The Politics of Democratization in Europe. Concepts and Histories/ (2008); /Hegel's Philosophy and Feminist Thought: Beyond Antigone?/ and /Siveellisyydestä seksuaalisuuteen -- poliittisen käsitteen historia [From Sittlichkeit to Sexuality -- the History of a Political Concept] /(2011).

Third World Feminism and Post-Colonial Theory and Agency (7,5 ECTS)

The Teachers:

Nefissa Naguib (Senior Researcher, Chr. Michelsen Institute, Norway; Professor II at the Institute for Social Anthropology at the University of Bergen). Anthropologist whose work links culture and history with politics. Her studies include themes such as culture and the moral economy of food and water; gender and religious minorities; faith-based activism; humanitarianism and military efforts. Her research projects and publications can be accessed http://www.cmi.no/staff/?nefissa-naguib

Susanne Dahlgren (Senior Lecturer, Development Studies, University of Helsinki). Anthropologist interested in legal anthropology, Islamic law, contemporary social movements, politics and revolution, and moralities of faith and religious practice. Her publications can be accessed https://tuhat.halvi.helsinki.fi/portal/en/persons/susanne-dahlgren%284c6...

Mulki Al-Sharmani (Academy Research Fellow, Comparative Religion, University of Helsinki). With PhD from Johns Hopkins University, her research focuses on Islamic feminism, Muslim family laws and legal activism, and refugees and diasporic communities. Her publications can be accessed https://tuhat.halvi.helsinki.fi/portal/en/persons/mulki-alsharmani%28751...

Feminist Theory and Feminist Politics

6-8.5. 2014  SKY doctoral course (7,5 ECTS)

The Teachers:

Athena Athanasiou (Ass. Prof. of Anthropology Panteion University, Greece).  Anthropologist, who has published on feminist theory,  technologies of the  body, biopolitics, psychoanalysis, nationalism, postcoloniality, affect, feminist movements, 'Women in Black',  the Balkans, and Greece in crisis.   

Elena Tzelepis (Dr, Centre of Advance Study, Sofia), Specialist on continental philosophy, who has written on contemporary reading s of ancient philosophy, Irigaray and Antigone, the intersections of the political and the psychic, and the workings of critique. 

Tuija Pulkkinen (Academy professor, University of Helsinki, Gender Studies). Has published on political thought, nationalism, democratic theory and conceptual change;  and on genealogy and performativity of gender. Works currently on politics of philosophy within contemporary feminist theory.

SKY START: 1/14 Workshop Meeting

(5.-6. June 2014)

Professor PENELOPE DEUTSCHER (Nortwestern University):
‘That Death Which is Not One: Woman as Exception in Derrida’s The Death Penalty’

Penelope Deutscher is Professor in the Department of Philosophy and an affiliate of  the  Comparative Literary Studies and Gender and Sexualities programs at Northwestern University. She is the author of The Philosophy of Simone de Beauvoir: Ambiguity, Conversion, Resistance (Cambridge U.P, 2008),  How to Read Derrida (Granta/Norton 2005), A Politics of Impossible Difference: The Later Work of Luce Irigaray (Cornell U.P., 2002) and Yielding Gender: Feminism, Deconstruction and the History of Philosophy (Routledge 1997). She co-edited Repenser le  politique: l’apport du féminisme. (co-edited, with Françoise Collin, Campagne première/Les Cahiers du Grif, 2004) and  Enigmas: Essays on Sarah Kofman.,co-edited, with Kelly Oliver ( Cornell U.P. 1999). In 2000 she was guest editor of a special issue of Hypatia, Contemporary French Women Philosophers. She is the coeditor of a forthcoming volume of essays on Foucault and Derrida with Columbia University Press, and completing work on Foucault's Children: Biopolitics, Thanatopolitics, and Reproductive Futurism.

SKY START: 1/14 Workshop Meeting

(5.-6. June)

Emanuela Lombardo (Madrid, Complutense University, Spain)
 
"Gender mainstreaming and policy responses to the economic crisis: The ‘unintended consequences’ of EU and national policymaking on Spanish gender equality policies"

Emanuela Lombardo,PhD in Politics at the University of Reading (UK), is Lecturer at the Department of Political Science and Administration II of Madrid Complutense University (Spain). She has worked as researcher in different European projects (European Commission FP4, FP5, and FP6, and POM Programs). Her research concerns gender equality policies, particularly in the European Union and Spain, gender mainstreaming, and gender and political representation. On these issues she has published articles in refereed journals and chapters in edited books. Her last book, edited with Maxime Forest, is The Europeanization of Gender Equality Policies (Palgrave 2012). Her forthcoming monograph, authored with Petra Meier, is The Symbolic Representation of Gender (Ashgate). For further information see http://www.ucm.es/info/target/

Gender, Culture and Society Doctoral Programme
SKY – Sukupuoli, kulttuuri ja yhteiskunta
Open Seminar

Programme

13.15-14.15 Introduction to Gender, Culture and Society (SKY) Doctoral Programme
Welcome and introductions – Johanna Kantola, Gender Studies
Introduction to University of Helsinki Doctoral Programmes – Maija Urponen, Faculty of Arts
Introduction to SKY – Tuija Pulkkinen, Gender Studies
Discussion and Questions

14.15 -14.45 Coffee break

14.45-16 Teaching and supervision in SKY
Introduction to the session – Johanna Kantola, Gender Studies
Introduction to teaching, courses and supervision in SKY – Tuija Pulkkinen, Gender Studies
Discussion and feedback

 

Bulletin 26.3.2020

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